Posts

Driving Down Carbon: The Role of Electric and Autnomous Vehicles

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Driving Down Carbon:  The Role of Electric and Autonomous Vehicles
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 • 7:00 p.m. SEIU Local 49 Hall, 3536 SE 26th Ave, Portland Free and Open to the Public
How will the rapidly accelerating introduction of autonomous, electric, and hybrid vehicles impact our lives and environment? How will they impact greenhouse gas emissions? How might they change the urban landscape? Find out when Let’s Talk Climate presents a panel discussion on strategies and effects of electric and autonomous vehicles on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at 7:00 p.m. We will meet at the SEIU Local 49 Union Hall at 3526 SE 26th Ave, Portland, just south of Powell. The adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) has outpaced most expectations. In addition to passenger cars, electric transit buses and delivery trucks are on the horizon. The technology for autonomous vehicles (AVs) is developing rapidly. It is widely expected that AVs will be electrically driven and used on demand in a shared transportation economy…

The Clean Energy Jobs Bill: This Year’s Top Priority -- Feb 8, 2018

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Let’s Talk Climate starts its third (2018) season on Thursday, February 8, with a 7:00 p.m. public program concerning the Clean Energy Jobs bill, which Governor Brown has said is a “must pass” for the 2018 legislative session. Come find out why this bill is top priority and how it makes a significant effort to address climate change in Oregon. The event will be held at the SEIU Local 49 Union Hall, 3536 SE 26th Ave., Portland. Panelists include Nancy Hamilton, Co-Chair of the Oregon Business Alliance for Climate, on ways that Oregon’s businesses will benefit from this bill; Dylan Kruse, Policy Director for Sustainable Northwest, on benefits to the forestry industry, agricultural sector, fisheries, and rural Oregon; and Shilpa Joshi, Coalition Director of Renew Oregon, on the current status of the bill in Salem. With a wide range of supporters from many elements of Oregon’s economy, this bill would generate income from fees for excess CO2 generation and put the funds toward the develo…

Slides from Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

Our panelists for the May 17, 2017 event have provided copies of their slides to share here. Click here to view the handout, What's Next, with live links.

Slides from Dr. Nicki Nabavizadeh,Pediatric Resident, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, OHSU and Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility are here.

Slides from Gordon Levitt, Climate Law Fellow, Our Children's Trust are here.

Slides from Anna Tadio, Lewis and Clark Law School student are here.
Slides from LeeAnne Fergason, Safe Routes to Schools advocate, The Street Trust are here.

What Next: Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

This handout was provided to attendees at our May 17 event, and is reproduced here with live links.
Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People
What Next?

Thank you for participating in Let’s Talk Climate.
You can learn more about us on our webpage [here!], like our Facebook page, and join our mailing list. Links to do that and for each of the suggestions below can be found [here].
Learn More: About Our Children’s Trust and about their Federal lawsuit.About The Street TrustAbout Oregon Physicians for Social ResponsibilityFollow the Two Green Leaves Blog
Advocate: Urge your state Representative and Senator to vote for climate abatement and mitigation and to put a cap on carbon. Attend constituent meetings, call, e-mail, or write them. Learn who represents you and about pending legislation at the OLIS website.Check out Renew Oregon, the Oregon Environmental Council, and 350PDX for current opportunities to advocate.
Make Personal Changes: Talk with children, youth,…

Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

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On Wednesday, May 17th, 7pm, Let's Talk Climate hosts the final forum for spring 2017, titled "Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People" at TaborSpace Commons, 5441 SE Belmont, Portland.
Some think of climate change as a topic for grownups, yet the long term impacts will take their greatest toll on today’s young people. Many teens in the Portland area are already involved in addressing climate issues, and many adult allies are speaking up about the impacts of climate change on future generations, especially those growing up right now under the specter of a warming planet.  Children in all communities may bear the greatest physical, emotional, and social vulnerabilities in an economically and politically uncertain climate future.
The forum will feature: Oregon House Rep.Alissa Keny-Guyer, moderator  Dr. Nicki Nabavizadeh, Pediatric Resident, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, OHSU and Oregon PSR Gordon Levitt, Climate Law Fellow, Our Childr…

Portland's Urban Heat Islands: Unequal Impacts -- What Next?

This handout has been prepared for our Let's Talk Climate conversation on April 18, 2017.
You can learn more about us here on our webpage, like our Facebook page, and join our mailing list
Learn More: About Vivek Shandas’ Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab at PSU and their workAbout OPAL’s environmental justice effortsAbout TriMet’s strategic planningAbout the City of Portland’s Climate Action PlanAbout Audubon’s work with urban forestsAbout urban forestry and tree planting at Arbor Day festivities at Mt. Scott Park on Saturday, April 22Check out recent climate news at Oregon Environmental Council
Advocate: Urge your state Representative and Senator to vote for climate abatement and mitigation and to put a cap on carbon. Attend constituent meetings, call, e-mail, or write them. Learn who represents you and about pending legislation at the OLIS website.Join the People’s Climate March in Portland on April 29thCheck out Renew Oregon and 350PDX for current opportunities to advoc…

Portland’s Urban Heat Island: Unequal Impacts

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On Tuesday, April 18th, 7pm, Let’s Talk Climate will host its next forum, titled “Portland’s Urban Heat Islands: Unequal Impacts,” at TaborSpace, 5441 SE Belmont St, Portland. Heat islands reflect areas where temperatures are unusually hot over a prolonged period. As climate change warms the planet, cities are warming at a faster pace due to dark, heat- absorbing roads and roofs. Though Portland is relatively “cool” compared to other U.S. cities, it has become a significant urban heat island, showing climate effects distinct from surrounding fields and forests.
In Portland, as in other cities, such heat impacts tend to fall disproportionately on vulnerable populations such as the elderly, the low income, and communities of color. People in these neighborhoods are less likely to have large shade trees, less likely to have air conditioning, and more likely to suffer from asthma and other air quality health problems. 
Climate equity is a key concern in the city's 2015 Climate Action Pl…