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Slides from Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

Our panelists for the May 17, 2017 event have provided copies of their slides to share here. Click here to view the handout, What's Next, with live links.

Slides from Dr. Nicki Nabavizadeh,Pediatric Resident, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, OHSU and Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility are here.

Slides from Gordon Levitt, Climate Law Fellow, Our Children's Trust are here.

Slides from Anna Tadio, Lewis and Clark Law School student are here.
Slides from LeeAnne Fergason, Safe Routes to Schools advocate, The Street Trust are here.

What Next: Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

This handout was provided to attendees at our May 17 event, and is reproduced here with live links.
Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People
What Next?

Thank you for participating in Let’s Talk Climate.
You can learn more about us on our webpage [here!], like our Facebook page, and join our mailing list. Links to do that and for each of the suggestions below can be found [here].
Learn More: About Our Children’s Trust and about their Federal lawsuit.About The Street TrustAbout Oregon Physicians for Social ResponsibilityFollow the Two Green Leaves Blog
Advocate: Urge your state Representative and Senator to vote for climate abatement and mitigation and to put a cap on carbon. Attend constituent meetings, call, e-mail, or write them. Learn who represents you and about pending legislation at the OLIS website.Check out Renew Oregon, the Oregon Environmental Council, and 350PDX for current opportunities to advocate.
Make Personal Changes: Talk with children, youth,…

Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People

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On Wednesday, May 17th, 7pm, Let's Talk Climate hosts the final forum for spring 2017, titled "Vulnerable Populations: Climate Change Impacts on Children and Young People" at TaborSpace Commons, 5441 SE Belmont, Portland.
Some think of climate change as a topic for grownups, yet the long term impacts will take their greatest toll on today’s young people. Many teens in the Portland area are already involved in addressing climate issues, and many adult allies are speaking up about the impacts of climate change on future generations, especially those growing up right now under the specter of a warming planet.  Children in all communities may bear the greatest physical, emotional, and social vulnerabilities in an economically and politically uncertain climate future.
The forum will feature: Oregon House Rep.Alissa Keny-Guyer, moderator  Dr. Nicki Nabavizadeh, Pediatric Resident, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, OHSU and Oregon PSR Gordon Levitt, Climate Law Fellow, Our Childr…

Portland's Urban Heat Islands: Unequal Impacts -- What Next?

This handout has been prepared for our Let's Talk Climate conversation on April 18, 2017.
You can learn more about us here on our webpage, like our Facebook page, and join our mailing list
Learn More: About Vivek Shandas’ Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab at PSU and their workAbout OPAL’s environmental justice effortsAbout TriMet’s strategic planningAbout the City of Portland’s Climate Action PlanAbout Audubon’s work with urban forestsAbout urban forestry and tree planting at Arbor Day festivities at Mt. Scott Park on Saturday, April 22Check out recent climate news at Oregon Environmental Council
Advocate: Urge your state Representative and Senator to vote for climate abatement and mitigation and to put a cap on carbon. Attend constituent meetings, call, e-mail, or write them. Learn who represents you and about pending legislation at the OLIS website.Join the People’s Climate March in Portland on April 29thCheck out Renew Oregon and 350PDX for current opportunities to advoc…

Portland’s Urban Heat Island: Unequal Impacts

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On Tuesday, April 18th, 7pm, Let’s Talk Climate will host its next forum, titled “Portland’s Urban Heat Islands: Unequal Impacts,” at TaborSpace, 5441 SE Belmont St, Portland. Heat islands reflect areas where temperatures are unusually hot over a prolonged period. As climate change warms the planet, cities are warming at a faster pace due to dark, heat- absorbing roads and roofs. Though Portland is relatively “cool” compared to other U.S. cities, it has become a significant urban heat island, showing climate effects distinct from surrounding fields and forests.
In Portland, as in other cities, such heat impacts tend to fall disproportionately on vulnerable populations such as the elderly, the low income, and communities of color. People in these neighborhoods are less likely to have large shade trees, less likely to have air conditioning, and more likely to suffer from asthma and other air quality health problems. 
Climate equity is a key concern in the city's 2015 Climate Action Pl…

Mayor’s Town Hall on Portland’s Climate Priorities

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Let’s Talk Climate will host Mayor Ted Wheeler in a Climate Action Town Hall on Thursday, March 16th at 7 p.m. in TaborSpace, 5441 SE Belmont St., Portland. Climate stability and preparedness were key topics during the 2016 election campaign and Portland citizens elected a mayor who has made climate action a top priority.
Portland’s Climate Action Plan calls for significant commitment from many of the city bureaus in order to prepare for the inevitable impacts of climate change. Hotter summers, more flooding, new levels of uncertainty – these are some of the predictions for the coming decades in Portland. This town hall offers an opportunity to hear from city officials as they consider climate action steps in the immediate future. How will the bureaus meet these new goals? How will the mayor set priorities? How can citizens contribute to help mitigate climate impacts?
The mayor will speak briefly, followed by comments by senior staff, with plenty of time for questions and answers in a t…

Let’s Talk Climate Creativity

Here is Stephanie Kaza's February column.
Yes, it’s true, 2016 was the warmest year on record for the planet. And that was also true for 2015 and 2014.The trend lines are pretty clear from the basic temperature measurements.And for those of us still relying on a fact-based world, these numbers are a wake-up call.Things are not miraculously turning around and getting better on their own, at least temperature-wise.
This could be a call for more anxiety and concern or it could be a call for more creativity. Let’s go with that as a basic policy – how can we apply our fantastic human imagination to climate challenges and be even more creative than we’ve already been? How could we reduce fossil fuel dependence AND, for example, also increase affordable housing?
One potential answer lies in the emerging “passive house” or net zero movement.  It is now possible to cut energy use almost to zero through advances in building sciences and technologies. New materials for walls and roof structures…

Aiming for Carbon Zero and Portland Housing Choices

Portland’s Climate Action goals call for all new buildings to achieve zero-net carbon emissions by 2030. Can it be done? Let’s Talk Climate takes up this question on Wednesday, February 15 at 7 p.m. in Copeland Commons, TaborSpace, 5441 SE Belmont St., Portland. Advances in science and technology have now made it possible to build homes that cut energy use to close to zero and are still affordable. Just like advances in wind and solar technology, these ultra-low energy buildings are becoming more accessible every day, and some are now being built as affordable housing.
Here in the Portland metro area, the low-energy Orchards at Orenco complex, built by REACH, recently completed phase II for families whose income is under $30,000/year. REACH states that “The building is expected to achieve nearly 90% energy reduction for heating and 60-70% less overall energy use compared with a typical building of the same type and size in the Pacific Northwest.  Innovative features include triple-pane…

What Lies Ahead for State-Wide Energy Policy?

Let’s Talk Climate kicks off the 2017 series on Wednesday, January 25 with a high-powered discussion of climate-related measures coming before the Oregon legislature. The event will take place at 7 p.m. in Copeland Commons Room of TaborSpace, 5441 SE Belmont St., Portland.

A three-member panel will discuss upcoming legislation in the Oregon Legislature’s “long session,” January through June, followed by a question/answer discussion with the audience.

Angus Duncan, Chair of the Oregon Global Warming Commission, will speak first about legislation that the Commission believes necessary for Oregon to meet its climate goals. Because the Commission recommends statutory and administrative changes, policies, and other actions to be carried out by the state government, it plays a key role in determining measures to be introduced in this legislative session.

Senator Michael Dembrow, representing Oregon’s 23rd District in the Oregon Senate, will give an insider's view of upcoming environmental …

Let’s Talk Climate Hope: Progress to Build On

Stephanie Kaza's recent article appears in the SE Examiner's January issue. Thus:

In the aftermath of the November election, many people are wondering what will happen with U.S. climate commitments.  Many people fear we will lose ground with cabinet nominees who seem bent on unraveling all climate action progress.  There are plenty of good reasons to imagine a backward-trending future under such leadership.
But let’s not go there for a minute.  Here’s something different for the New Year: let’s look at Oregon’s successes and celebrate how far we’ve come.  Celebrating success seems out of fashion in the midst of so much handwringing.  But it is still good to know our history and what we have to build on as our state legislature begins this year’s work.  
The Oregon Global Warming Commission is one of the lead state agencies for tracking climate progress.  In a recent memo to the Oregon League of Women Voters, the chair of the Commission, Angus Duncan, pointed out significant steps…